Sangamo Electric Company Type H Wattmeter, 1911-1914

Summary

In the late 1800s, companies that supplied electricity to consumers needed a way to measure how much customers used--and then charge them accordingly. Induction-type wattmeters proved reliable and would become the industry standard, but until 1910 Westinghouse held the patent rights. Sangamo Electric Company introduced this induction-type meter -- the smallest model on the market at the time -- in 1911 after the patents had expired.

In the late 1800s, companies that supplied electricity to consumers needed a way to measure how much customers used--and then charge them accordingly. Induction-type wattmeters proved reliable and would become the industry standard, but until 1910 Westinghouse held the patent rights. Sangamo Electric Company introduced this induction-type meter -- the smallest model on the market at the time -- in 1911 after the patents had expired.

Artifact

Wattmeter

Date Made

1911-1914

Location

Not on exhibit to the public.

Object ID

43.141.39

Credit

From the Collections of The Henry Ford. Gift of Consumers Power Company.

Material

Metal
Glass (Material)

Color

Black (Color)
White (Color)

Dimensions

Height: 7 in

Width: 6 in

Length: 6.25 in

Inscriptions

on face: TYPE H WATTHOUR METER/ SANGAMO ELECTRIC COMPANY/ SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS on readout: 10923 kilowatt hours on plate at bottom: AMPS 5/ VOLTS 110/ CYCLES 60/ 2 WIRE/ WATTHOURS PER DISK REV. 5/24/ LINE 3962/ NO. 1138524/ LOAD

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