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Posts Tagged antique cars

If you’ve ever been to the Old Car Festival at Greenfield Village, you might be familiar with the 1920s Auto Touring exhibit. Since 2002, the exhibit has been a staple for the country’s longest-running antique car show, reminding guests what an event a “road trip” was in the early days of automobiles. To celebrate the exhibit’s 10th anniversary, roadside historian Daniel Hershberger has given the event a new twist, this time focusing on the evolution of auto touring in the early years of the 20th century, from 1914 to 1930.

1927 Auto-Kamp trailer with plate

I had a chance to talk to Dan last week about next weekend’s activities and there are some great features in store. Overall, the exhibit has expanded in its offerings. For some of the regular guests Dan sees year after year, he thinks they’ll really like what this year has to offer. An exhibit like this provides a different angle to Old Car Festival, because just as automobiles evolved, so did the motor camping industry.

For 2012, the exhibit is broken into four vignettes:

Model T Touring with tent

The Early Years

Take a look at a circa 1915 Model T five-passenger touring car outfitted with a lean-to tent.

Advent of the Trailer Era

A fully restored model of the Clare Trailer Company’s earliest offerings will not only be set up but guests can actually enter the trailer and take a look inside.

1927 Auto-Kamp trailer with Gear

The Matured Fold-Out Tent Trailer

Historians and experts believe the golden age of motor camping to be the 1920s, with the peak being reached in 1927. Guests will be able to take a look at a restored 1927 Auto-Kamp fold-out tent trailer, made in Saginaw, Mich.

1929 Covered Wagon Trailer

The End of an Era and the Birth of an Industry

A special addition this year to the exhibit, a Covered Wagon Company travel trailer prototype will be on loan from the Detroit Historical Society. The trailer, which hasn’t been on display in decades, is an important part in the evolution of auto touring as it essentially launched the modern trailer industry that we know today. Guests will learn about Arthur Sherman, the creator of the trailer, and his desire to create a camper that was easier to use for motorists.

If you’re curious to learn more about the evolution of auto touring, join us at Old Car Festival Sept. 8-9. The event is free with village admission.

Lish Dorset is Social Media Manager at The Henry Ford.

antique cars, camping

My husband, the kids and I spent the better part of Sunday at the Old Car Show at Greenfield Village. After all the bad weather we've been having, it was truly glorious to be out and about admiring the hundreds of vehicles displayed (and driving!) in the show.

Vehicles at the show are those built from the 1880s to 1932. It was fascinating to see how many unique ideas different vehicle manufacturers had building some of those really early machines. Since this show is more about what you could see (although the sounds of the old engines were like music), below are (some) photos of this wonderful event. And here's a video of the 1770 Fardier de Cugnot in action.

We were transported to a different time and place during the Old Car Show at Greenfield Village.

My husband asks the driver questions about the three-wheeled 1885 Benz Motorwagen replica.

Here's a replica of Gottlieb Daimler and Wilhelm Maybach's 1885 Reitwagen: the world's first internal combustion motorcycle.

Michael Robinson, from Syracuse, New York, stands beside his 1909 Sears H Runabout. There were 11 Sears Autobuggies at the show.

Judges check out Robinson's 1909 Sears Autobuggy.

The grand-daddy of old vehicles. A working replica of the 1770 Fardier de Cugnot brought to the event from the Tampa Auto Museum.

Some participants displayed technical information on a vehicle at the show, others the history of their vehicles or photos of the restoration process.

Cars take to the road as they tour around the village.

Fourteen-year-old Mary Claire is taking a photo of her dream ride.

It was fun how folks get right into the spirit.

A highlight was watching this team assemble a Model T in a little over 5 minutes, explaining the processes the whole time.

Here they are, posing by the finished car. Awesome.

Henry admires an Electric car from 1925.

We ate our picnic lunch watching the fun and games at Walnut Grove. Drag races, relay races, how-slow-can-you-go races. Good fun.

Some of the technology wasn't always reliable as this driver tries to crank start this Ford.

Kristine Hass is a mother of five and long-time member of The Henry Ford. She frequently blogs about her family's visits to America's Greatest History Attraction.

antique cars, Old Car Festival