Ambler's Mowing Machine, circa 1836

Summary

This is probably the oldest surviving American harvester. Enoch Ambler, a resident of Montgomery County, New York, patented this machine in 1834 and demonstrated it by cutting about 100 acres of grass in 1835. Interest in the mower led Beale & Griswold of Spencertown, New York, to buy Ambler's patent and attempt commercial production for the 1836 and 1837 seasons.

This is probably the oldest surviving American harvester. Enoch Ambler, a resident of Montgomery County, New York, patented this machine in 1834 and demonstrated it by cutting about 100 acres of grass in 1835. Interest in the mower led Beale & Griswold of Spencertown, New York, to buy Ambler's patent and attempt commercial production for the 1836 and 1837 seasons.

Artifact

Mowing machine

Date Made

circa 1836

Creators

Ambler, Enoch, 1807-1878 

Beale, Matthew K. 

Griswold, Sherman 

Place of Creation

United States, New York, Root 

United States, New York, Spencertown 

Creator Notes

Patented by Enoch Ambler of Root, New York and manufactured by Matthew K. Beale and Sherman Griswold of Spencertown, New York.

Agriculture
 On Exhibit

at Henry Ford Museum in Agriculture

Object ID

24.94.1

Credit

From the Collections of The Henry Ford.

Material

Wood (Plant material)
Cast iron

Dimensions

Width: 110 in

Length: 106 in

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