Halloween Postcard Designed by Ellen Clapsaddle, 1917

Summary

During the 1800s, Irish immigrants had a great influence on the celebration of Halloween in the United States. They substituted traditional lanterns carved from hollowed-out turnips with pumpkins, a squash native to America. This colorful postcard features these jack-o-lanterns, which had become the symbol of the American Halloween by the turn of the 20th century.

During the 1800s, Irish immigrants had a great influence on the celebration of Halloween in the United States. They substituted traditional lanterns carved from hollowed-out turnips with pumpkins, a squash native to America. This colorful postcard features these jack-o-lanterns, which had become the symbol of the American Halloween by the turn of the 20th century.

Artifact

Postcard

Date Made

1917

Subject Date

1917

Creators

Clapsaddle, Ellen H. (Ellen Hattie), 1865-1934 

International Art Publishing Company 

Place of Creation

United States, New York, New York 

Germany, Berlin 

Creator Notes

Illustration by artist Ellen H. Clapsaddle; published by International Art Publishing Company of New York, New York and Berlin, Germany. Printed in Germany.

 On Exhibit

By Request in the Benson Ford Research Center

Object ID

2010.56.1

Credit

From the Collections of The Henry Ford.

Material

Paper (Fiber product)

Technique

Embossing (Technique)

Color

Multicolored

Dimensions

Height: 5.5 in

Width: 3.5 in

Inscriptions

Printed on front above image: Ellen H. Clapsaddle Printed below image: Printed Only / Copyrighted By / The / Int'l / Art Pub. Co. 1917 Printed one each under each pumpkin head on left and right borders: Rich Man / Poor Man / Beggar Man / Thief / Doctor / Lawyer / Merchant / Chief Printed on upper left corner of address side: Series No. 1238 Printed upper left address side: International Art Publ. Co. / NEW YORK BERLIN / PRINTED IN GERMANY Handwritten in pencil on address side: Miss Ruth Fowler / N Fowler St / City

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