Portrait of Robert O. Derrick, Architect of Henry Ford Museum and Lovett Hall, circa 1929

Summary

Robert O. Derrick (1890-1961) was a young architect with only three public buildings completed, when Henry Ford gave him the commission for the museum. Trained at Yale and Columbia Universities, he was skilled in historical revival styles, which were at the peak of their popularity in the 1920s. His reproduction of Philadelphia’s Independence Hall, the most iconic building in American history, made the museum famous.

Robert O. Derrick (1890-1961) was a young architect with only three public buildings completed, when Henry Ford gave him the commission for the museum. Trained at Yale and Columbia Universities, he was skilled in historical revival styles, which were at the peak of their popularity in the 1920s. His reproduction of Philadelphia’s Independence Hall, the most iconic building in American history, made the museum famous.

Artifact

Photographic print

Subject Date

circa 1929

Creators

Unknown

 On Exhibit

By Request in the Benson Ford Research Center

Object ID

84.1.1660.P.O.11097

Credit

From the Collections of The Henry Ford. Gift of Ford Motor Company.

Material

Paper (Fiber product)

Technique

Gelatin silver process

Color

Black-and-white (Colors)

Dimensions

Height: 10 in

Width: 8.5 in

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