Stained Glass White Castle Sign, 1930s

Summary

Restaurant owners, Walter Anderson and Billy Ingram, packaged their fast food concept in compact, castle-like structures. These "White Castles" conveyed cleanliness, stability, and permanence. This sign was used at a 1930s White Castle.

Restaurant owners, Walter Anderson and Billy Ingram, packaged their fast food concept in compact, castle-like structures. These "White Castles" conveyed cleanliness, stability, and permanence. This sign was used at a 1930s White Castle.

Walter Anderson, a Wichita, Kansas fry cook, prepared a tasty hamburger at his small eatery in the late 1910s. His success led him to open two more shops. In 1921, Billy Ingram joined Anderson and a fourth shop was opened. The owners limited the food choice, but made it palatable and served it quickly. The pair also packaged their version of fast food in a compact, castle-like structure. The "White Castle" conveyed cleanliness, stability, and permanence. By the end of the 1930s small white castles had spread across the Midwest and onto the east coast. This stained glass sign was used in a 1930s White Castle.

Detailed Description
Artifact

Advertising sign

Date Made

1930-1939

Creators

Unknown

Driving America
 On Exhibit

at Henry Ford Museum in Driving America

Object ID

92.42.1

Credit

From the Collections of The Henry Ford. Gift of White Castle System, Inc.

Material

Stained glass (Material)

Color

Orange (Color)
Brown
White (Color)

Inscriptions

On front WHITE CASTLE

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