HP-35 Scientific Calculator, 1973

Summary

In 1971, William Hewlett challenged his engineers to miniaturize the company's 9100A Desktop Calculator--a forty-pound machine--into a device small enough to fit into his shirt pocket. The result--the HP-35--was the world's first handheld scientific calculator. It was expensive, but its powerful processing capabilities made it a rapid success, causing the swift abandonment of the slide rule.

In 1971, William Hewlett challenged his engineers to miniaturize the company's 9100A Desktop Calculator--a forty-pound machine--into a device small enough to fit into his shirt pocket. The result--the HP-35--was the world's first handheld scientific calculator. It was expensive, but its powerful processing capabilities made it a rapid success, causing the swift abandonment of the slide rule.

Artifact

Calculator

Date Made

1973

Location

Not on exhibit to the public.

Object ID

2014.67.1

Credit

From the Collections of The Henry Ford. In Memory of Professor John M. Hayes.

Material

Plastic (Organic material)
Metal

Color

Gray (Color)
Black (Color)
Blue
White (Color)

Dimensions

Height: 2.5 in

Width: 11 in

Length: 5.25 in

Inscriptions

On top of case: HEWLETT-PACKARD/ 10900 WOLFE ROAD, CUPERTINO, CALIFORNIA 95014 On front of calculator: HEWLETT-PACKARD 35 On back of calculator: HEWLETT-PACKARD HP-35 INSTRUCTIONS/ LOW BATTERY LIGHTS ALL DECIMAL POINTS/.../ HEWLETT-PACKARD/ 3.75V 500 MW/ MADE IN USA PATENT PENDING Handwritten on case: J. M. HAYES

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