Expert Sets

The experts at The Henry Ford have carefully created these sets. Explore a specific topic or use these as a foundation for building your own collection.

The experts at The Henry Ford have carefully created these sets. Explore a specific topic or use these as a foundation for building your own collection.

Just Added to Our Digital Collections

Created 01.24.2016 | 29 artifacts

Browse selected artifacts recently added to The Henry Ford's digital collections. These are just a handful of the over 400 new items digitized in May 2017.

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20th Century Mainstream Glass

Created 07.26.2017 | 15 artifacts

By the beginning of the 20th century, mass production made glass products affordable to Americans, from containers for food products to kitchenware. Decorative glass objects, such as art glass and fancy serving pieces, still had a place in the American home, but glass was increasingly viewed as utilitarian.

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Art Glass

Created 07.26.2017 | 15 artifacts

Dating from the late 19th century through the early 20th century, art glass is primarily decorative glass. Makers of art glass employed newly-developed technologies for producing vibrant colors and surface textures. This is most famously seen in the iridescent surfaces of Louis Comfort Tiffany and his contemporaries, although art glass took many shapes and forms.

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Glass for Showing Off

Created 07.26.2017 | 15 artifacts

Mid-19th century Americans were eager to show off their good taste and wealth to family, friends, and neighbors. Glass for decoration was an important part of middle and upper class domestic interiors of this period.

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Pressed Glass

Created 07.26.2017 | 15 artifacts

With a rapidly growing population in the early 19th century, American glassmakers experimented with new methods to supply an eager market. In the 1820s, pressing molten glass into metal molds by machine was perfected. By the 1830s, American manufacturers produced enough pressed glass tableware to export abroad. This technical innovation made America the leader in glass production.

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Glass in Early America

Created 07.26.2017 | 17 artifacts

The earliest glass in America was imported from the British Isles. Immigrants from mainland Europe brought their own traditions, establishing the first American glass factories. These entrepreneurs hoped to make money producing glass for household needs and window glass, but most failed due to foreign competition.

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Season 3: The Henry Ford’s Innovation Nation

Created 07.11.2017 | 26 artifacts

These key artifacts appeared on the third season of The Henry Ford’s Innovation Nation. For episode information, please visit https://www.thehenryford.org/explore/innovation-nation/episodes.

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Season 2: The Henry Ford’s Innovation Nation

Created 07.11.2017 | 26 artifacts

These key artifacts appeared on the second season of The Henry Ford’s Innovation Nation. For episode information, please visit https://www.thehenryford.org/explore/innovation-nation/episodes.

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Ruth Adler Schnee's Textiles

Created 06.28.2017 | 5 artifacts

Pioneering modern designer Ruth Adler Schnee’s bold textiles have broad appeal. Her furnishing and drapery fabrics were favorites of the everyday consumer and leading architects alike, including Minoru Yamasaki, Paul Rudolph, and Buckminster Fuller. Adler Schnee’s textiles, which feature vivid color and abstracted organic forms, added whimsy and depth to the sleek, minimal aesthetic popular in the mid-century period.

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Information Machines: Printing Presses at The Henry Ford

Created 06.12.2017 | 18 artifacts

The printing press democratized knowledge. As mechanical improvements were made, printing became faster and cheaper. By extension, the content of newspapers and books diversified, and the printed word was distributed on a mass scale. This collection documents the mechanical lineage of printing presses, from a circa 1809 Ramage--one of the oldest surviving hand presses in the country--to the efficient Mergenthaler Linotype composing machine.

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