Freedom of Speech

Artifacts from this
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"American Anti-Slavery Almanac for 1840"

  Details

"American Anti-Slavery Almanac for 1840"

View in our Collectionson thehenryford.org 

Artifact

Almanac

Date Made

1840

Summary

Beginning in the 1830s, some people began to speak out against slavery. Most of these "abolitionists" were white Northerners who had never actually come in contact with enslaved people. The abolitionist press, centered in northern states like New York and Massachusetts, produced and sold many almanacs that featured provocative cover illustrations depicting the brutality of slavery.

Object ID

2005.0.17.1

Credit

From the Collections of The Henry Ford.

With Liberty & Justice For All
 On Exhibit

at Henry Ford Museum in With Liberty & Justice for All

Get more details in Digital Collections at:

thehenryford.org

"American Anti-Slavery Almanac for 1840"

View in our Collectionson thehenryford.org 

What is The Henry Ford?

The national attraction for discovering your ingenuity while exploring America’s spirit of innovation. There is always much to see and do at The Henry Ford.

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Tempera Painting, "The Strike," by Arthur R. Lehmann, 1941

  Details

Tempera Painting, "The Strike," by Arthur R. Lehmann, 1941

View in our Collectionson thehenryford.org 

Artifact

Painting (Visual work)

Date Made

1941

Summary

Arthur Lehmann created this painting while employed by the Works Progress Administration in Detroit. Lehmann chanced upon unionizing efforts at the Ford Rouge Plant in 1937, creating a sketch of workers picketing outside the plant gates. Ultimately, the workers were successful and in 1941 Ford became a union shop. In a meticulously personal style, Lehmann depicts the unionizing process in the finished painting.

Object ID

2013.126.1

Credit

From the Collections of The Henry Ford. Gift of Tina Emenheiser and Richard T. Lehmann.

Location

Not on exhibit to the public.

Get more details in Digital Collections at:

thehenryford.org

Tempera Painting, "The Strike," by Arthur R. Lehmann, 1941

View in our Collectionson thehenryford.org 

What is The Henry Ford?

The national attraction for discovering your ingenuity while exploring America’s spirit of innovation. There is always much to see and do at The Henry Ford.

VIEW CALENDAR

  Details

"Pussyhat", Worn During the Women's March in Washington, D.C., January 2017

  Details

"Pussyhat", Worn During the Women's March in Washington, D.C., January 2017

View in our Collectionson thehenryford.org 

Artifact

Hat

Date Made

January 2017

Summary

In January 2017, millions of women--some donning pink knitted hats--gathered across America in a show of solidarity for women's rights and to protest the demeaning rhetoric made during the 2016 Presidential elections. (This hat's name refers to a derogatory comment made by Donald Trump in 2005.) This call to action brought a greater awareness of women's issues and an increased participation in electoral decision making in the following years.

Creators

Baker, Ruth 

Place of Creation

United States, West Virginia 

Object ID

2017.79.1

Credit

From the Collections of The Henry Ford. Gift of Anne Doyle.

Location

Not on exhibit to the public.

Get more details in Digital Collections at:

thehenryford.org

"Pussyhat", Worn During the Women's March in Washington, D.C., January 2017

View in our Collectionson thehenryford.org 

What is The Henry Ford?

The national attraction for discovering your ingenuity while exploring America’s spirit of innovation. There is always much to see and do at The Henry Ford.

VIEW CALENDAR

  Details