Brownie Movie Projector, circa 1955

Summary

When Kodak invented the "Standard 8" film format in 1932, they also ushered in the rise of "home movies." Both 8mm film stock and cameras were affordable and widespread by the 1950s. From family events to amateur and experimental movie productions, these cameras provided a new way to record personal history, and alternative creative outlets to Hollywood entertainment.

When Kodak invented the "Standard 8" film format in 1932, they also ushered in the rise of "home movies." Both 8mm film stock and cameras were affordable and widespread by the 1950s. From family events to amateur and experimental movie productions, these cameras provided a new way to record personal history, and alternative creative outlets to Hollywood entertainment.

Artifact

Motion Picture Projector

Date Made

circa 1955

Location

Not on exhibit to the public.

Object ID

88.210.2

Credit

From the Collections of The Henry Ford.

Material

Cardboard
Glass (Material)
Nonferrous metal
Paper (Fiber product)
Plastic

Dimensions

Height: 10.25 in  (packaging)

Width: 8.5 in  (packaging)

Length: 12 in  (packaging)

Inscriptions

projector: Kodak / Brownie MOVIE PROJECTOR instruction sheet, interior of projector: How to Operate the / BROWNIE MOVIE PROJECTOR / [ . . . ] EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY product package: Kodak / Brownie Movie Projector / 8mm / A KOKAK PRODUCT

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