Steel Engraving, Portrait of Oliver Evans. The Watt of America, circa 1860

Summary

A visionary inventor and engineer, Oliver Evans (1755-1819) helped shape American manufacturing. In the late 1700s, Evans developed a continuous conveyor system for milling flour that revolutionized the industry and influenced the design of future automated factories. In 1804, he patented America's first high-pressure steam engine. Evans' new engine was reliable and versatile -- it was adapted for use in both manufacturing and steamboat propulsion.

A visionary inventor and engineer, Oliver Evans (1755-1819) helped shape American manufacturing. In the late 1700s, Evans developed a continuous conveyor system for milling flour that revolutionized the industry and influenced the design of future automated factories. In 1804, he patented America's first high-pressure steam engine. Evans' new engine was reliable and versatile -- it was adapted for use in both manufacturing and steamboat propulsion.

Artifact

Print (Visual work)

Date Made

circa 1860

Creators

Jackman, William G. 

John Appleton & Co. 

Place of Creation

United States, New York, New York 

Creator Notes

Engraved by Williams G. Jackman and published by John Appleton & Co. in New York City.

Collection Title

Seymour Dunbar Collection 

 On Exhibit

By Request in the Benson Ford Research Center

Object ID

82.129.720

Credit

From the Collections of The Henry Ford.

Material

Paper (Fiber product)
Cardboard

Technique

Steel engraving (Printing process)

Dimensions

Height: 9.75 in

Width: 6 in

Inscriptions

Typed paper adhered to mat board: Evans, Oliver. American Inventor. Builder of the steamboat "Eructor Amphibolis"./ at Philadelphia in 1804 (See encyclopedia for life history) / Steel engraving by W.G. Jackman. / Date: about 1860

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