"Amerikanischen Postwagen" (American Stage Coach, 1800-1810), Lithograph, circa 1815

Summary

Stage wagons were light and open, though not as comfortable as later Concord stagecoaches. They could go about five miles per hour, barring bad weather or road obstructions. The gaily painted signboards of roadside taverns beckoned weary travelers, promising rest, meals, and a chance to catch up on news. Stage wagon drivers used the stop to care for their horses.

Stage wagons were light and open, though not as comfortable as later Concord stagecoaches. They could go about five miles per hour, barring bad weather or road obstructions. The gaily painted signboards of roadside taverns beckoned weary travelers, promising rest, meals, and a chance to catch up on news. Stage wagon drivers used the stop to care for their horses.

Artifact

Print (Visual work)

Date Made

circa 1815

Subject Date

1800-1810

Creators

Weibezahl, R. 

Weld, Isaac, 1774-1856 

Place of Creation

Netherlands, Holland 

Creator Notes

Lithography by R. Weibezahl, Holland, Netherland, based on drawing by Isaac Weld.

Collection Title

Seymour Dunbar Collection 

 On Exhibit

By Request in the Benson Ford Research Center

Object ID

82.129.1509

Credit

From the Collections of The Henry Ford.

Material

Paper (Fiber product)

Color

Multicolored

Dimensions

Height: 5.375 in

Width: 6.625 in

Inscriptions

Description beneath: A stage coach of a type used shortly after 1800, passing a tavern./ Published in Holland./ Early lithograph, colored. Written above print: Reproduced from this print in Vol. I of "A History of Travel in America", as a colored frontispiece.

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