Gothic Revival Beam Engine, circa 1855

Summary

By the mid-1800s steam power had become widely adopted throughout settled areas of the United States. While refinements continued, the basic technology was accepted fully enough that it began to host contemporary decorative fashions. This engine's pronounced Gothic styling -- thoroughly digested into its (fairly advanced) engineering -- suggests the significance steam power had assumed both practically and philosophically.

By the mid-1800s steam power had become widely adopted throughout settled areas of the United States. While refinements continued, the basic technology was accepted fully enough that it began to host contemporary decorative fashions. This engine's pronounced Gothic styling -- thoroughly digested into its (fairly advanced) engineering -- suggests the significance steam power had assumed both practically and philosophically.

Artifact

Steam engine (Engine)

Date Made

circa 1855

Creators

I.P. Morris, Towne and Company 

Novelty Iron Works 

Place of Creation

United States, Pennsylvania, Philadelphia 

Creator Notes

Building of the engine is attributed to I.P. Morris, Towne and Company of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1836; rebuilt by the Novelty Iron Works in 1867

Henry Ford Museum
 On Exhibit

at Henry Ford Museum in Made in America

Object ID

30.489.1

Credit

From the Collections of The Henry Ford. Gift of John T. Lewis & Brothers Company

Material

Iron (Metal)
Sheet metal

Color

White (Color)

Dimensions

Width: 12.667 ft

Depth: 26.75 ft

Height: 30.542 ft

Diameter: 36 in  (Bore)

Weight: 45 lbs

Length: 72 in  (Stroke)

Horsepower: 250 hp  (186.42 kW)

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