Spading Fork, circa 1875

Summary

Turning the soil starts the process of crop cultivation. Flipping the top few inches exposes roots of grasses and plants that compete with the crop for nutrients. Breaking up packed dirt increases airflow and moisture retention which aids crop growth. Gardeners used short-handled forks with straight tines (metal points) like this to aerate and flip the soil in their seed beds.

Turning the soil starts the process of crop cultivation. Flipping the top few inches exposes roots of grasses and plants that compete with the crop for nutrients. Breaking up packed dirt increases airflow and moisture retention which aids crop growth. Gardeners used short-handled forks with straight tines (metal points) like this to aerate and flip the soil in their seed beds.

Artifact

Spading fork

Date Made

circa 1875

Creators

Unknown

Place of Creation

United States 

Location

Not on exhibit to the public.

Object ID

00.3.16971

Credit

From the Collections of The Henry Ford.

Material

Wood (Plant Material)
Iron (Metal)

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