U.S. Air Mail Pilot Charles Ames Delivering First Overnight Mail Service, 1925

Summary

Federally-subsidized air mail service encouraged commercial aviation. Pilots first navigated by visible landmarks, flying only in daylight. Lighted beacons, installed along flight paths, enabled night flights. It was dangerous work. Air mail pilot Charles Ames died when his plane crashed in central Pennsylvania, on the route from New York to Chicago, in 1925.

Federally-subsidized air mail service encouraged commercial aviation. Pilots first navigated by visible landmarks, flying only in daylight. Lighted beacons, installed along flight paths, enabled night flights. It was dangerous work. Air mail pilot Charles Ames died when his plane crashed in central Pennsylvania, on the route from New York to Chicago, in 1925.

Artifact

Photographic print

Date Made

1925

Subject Date

02 July 1925

Collection Title

Aeronautics Collection 

 On Exhibit

By Request in the Benson Ford Research Center

Object ID

2001.0.107.25

Credit

From the Collections of The Henry Ford.

Material

Paper (Fiber product)

Technique

Gelatin silver process

Color

Black-and-white (Colors)

Dimensions

Height: 6.5 in

Width: 8.5 in

Inscriptions

Typed sheet, now detached, reads in part: ...PILOT CHARLES H. AMES DELIVERING THE MAIL UPON ARRIVAL AT HADLEY FIELD, NEW BRUNSWICK, NEW JERSEY, AFTER THE NIGHT FLIGHT FROM CHICAGO, WEDNESDAY, JULY 1st. THUS WAS OPENED OFFICIALLY THE OVERNIGHT AIR MAIL SERVICE BETWEEN CHICAGO AND NEW YORK, THE TERMINUS OF THE LATTER BEING HADLEY FIELD, NEW BRUNSWICK, NEW JERSEY.

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