Copperplate Engraving, "Mansion House," 1842-1847

Summary

Built by Samuel D. Hubbard around 1827, the Mansion House served as a stagecoach stop providing meals and lodging to weary travelers passing through Middletown, Connecticut. The hotel also catered to local residents as a site for meetings and public celebrations. One notable party commemorated builder Samuel Hubbard's 1852 appointment to the office of United States Postmaster General.

Built by Samuel D. Hubbard around 1827, the Mansion House served as a stagecoach stop providing meals and lodging to weary travelers passing through Middletown, Connecticut. The hotel also catered to local residents as a site for meetings and public celebrations. One notable party commemorated builder Samuel Hubbard's 1852 appointment to the office of United States Postmaster General.

Artifact

Print (Visual work)

Subject Date

1842-1847

Collection Title

Seymour Dunbar Collection 

 On Exhibit

By Request in the Benson Ford Research Center

Object ID

82.129.1518

Credit

From the Collections of The Henry Ford.

Material

Paper (Fiber product)

Technique

Printing (Process)

Color

Black-and-white (Colors)

Dimensions

Height: 9.5 in

Width: 12 in

Inscriptions

Description beneath: the style of stage coach most widely used throughout the country from about 1815 to 1825. Its body, built of wood and sole leather, was shaped like a football. The driver signalled his arrival by blowing a horn. Broadside issued by the tavern on large paper. A chair and a chaise are also shown. [above print] Reproduced from this print in the "History of Travel in America", on p. 533, Vol. II.

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