Detroit, Toledo & Ironton Railroad Overpass, 1926

Summary

One way to make a railroad crossing safer was to eliminate it altogether. Overpasses separated trains from automobiles, but they were expensive to build and required extensive regrading of either the railroad or the roadway, and sometimes both. As a result, overpasses tended to be built only at the busiest crossings.

One way to make a railroad crossing safer was to eliminate it altogether. Overpasses separated trains from automobiles, but they were expensive to build and required extensive regrading of either the railroad or the roadway, and sometimes both. As a result, overpasses tended to be built only at the busiest crossings.

Artifact

Photographic print

Subject Date

1926

Creators

Unknown

 On Exhibit

By Request in the Benson Ford Research Center

Object ID

P.833.45266

Credit

From the Collections of The Henry Ford. Gift of Ford Motor Company.

Material

Paper (Fiber product)

Technique

Gelatin silver process

Color

Black-and-white (Colors)

Dimensions

Height: 8 in

Width: 10.5 in

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