Railroad Crossing Signal Lights, Detroit, Toledo & Ironton Railroad, November 1926

Summary

Blind curves -- whether on the railroad, the road, or both -- added another element of danger to a railroad crossing. Crossings like this were some of the first to be protected with automated warning devices. The lights and bells on these signs were activated whenever an approaching train tripped an electrical relay wired to the track.

Blind curves -- whether on the railroad, the road, or both -- added another element of danger to a railroad crossing. Crossings like this were some of the first to be protected with automated warning devices. The lights and bells on these signs were activated whenever an approaching train tripped an electrical relay wired to the track.

Artifact

Photographic print

Date Made

02 November 1926

Subject Date

02 November 1926

 On Exhibit

By Request in the Benson Ford Research Center

Object ID

64.167.548.P.833.47867

Credit

From the Collections of The Henry Ford. Gift of Ford Motor Company.

Material

Paper (Fiber product)
Linen (Material)

Technique

Gelatin silver process

Color

Black-and-white (Colors)

Dimensions

Height: 11.25 in  (book)

Width: 7.875 in  (book)

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