Jenkins Mechanical Scanning Tabletop RadiovisorTelevision Receiver RK-1 Kit, circa 1931

Summary

Television innovator Charles Frances Jenkins developed mechanical television projectors and receivers like this one as early as the 1920s. Mechanical television works by scanning images with a spinning disk and sending the data via radio waves; the spinning disks of the projectors and receivers must be synchronized. This kit receiver was marketed to radio amateurs; at its height, Jenkins' station in Washington DC broadcasted to several hundred "radiovisor" owners.

Television innovator Charles Frances Jenkins developed mechanical television projectors and receivers like this one as early as the 1920s. Mechanical television works by scanning images with a spinning disk and sending the data via radio waves; the spinning disks of the projectors and receivers must be synchronized. This kit receiver was marketed to radio amateurs; at its height, Jenkins' station in Washington DC broadcasted to several hundred "radiovisor" owners.

Artifact

Television receiver

Date Made

circa 1931

Creators

Acme Apparatus Corporation 

Creator Notes

This mechanical television receiver was designed by Charles Francis Jenkins with parts manufactured by the Acme Apparatus Corporation.

Location

Not on exhibit to the public.

Object ID

39.566.1

Credit

From the Collections of The Henry Ford.

Material

Oak (Wood)
Composite material
Aluminum (Metal)
Brass (Alloy)
Copper (Metal)

Dimensions

Width: 11.5 in

Depth: 11.625 in

Height: 16 in

Inscriptions

Bottom on condenser housing: AEROVOX / TYPE 402 / FILTER / CONDENSER / MADE IN U.S.A. BY / AEROVOX WIRELESS CORP. / BROOKLYN, N.Y. U.S.A. Yellow stamps on coils: ACME APPARAT[US] / CORPORAT[ION]

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