1899 Locomobile Runabout

Summary

This steam-powered runabout, by Locomobile, was built from designs by twin brothers, F. E. and F. O. Stanley. These early vehicles were fast, cheap, and relatively uncomplicated. However, fuel needs, excessive water consumption, and other inherent problems dogged the lightweight steamer. In 1902, Locomobile began production of a gasoline internal combustion engine. The company phased out their steam-powered vehicles in 1904.

This steam-powered runabout, by Locomobile, was built from designs by twin brothers, F. E. and F. O. Stanley. These early vehicles were fast, cheap, and relatively uncomplicated. However, fuel needs, excessive water consumption, and other inherent problems dogged the lightweight steamer. In 1902, Locomobile began production of a gasoline internal combustion engine. The company phased out their steam-powered vehicles in 1904.

Artifact

Automobile

Date Made

1899

Creators

Stanley, Francis Edgar, 1849-1918 

Stanley, Freelan Oscar, 1849-1940 

Locomobile Company of America 

Place of Creation

United States, Massachusetts, Newton 

United States, Massachusetts, Watertown 

Creator Notes

Designed by the Stanley Brothers, Francis and Freelan in Newton, Massachusetts and produced in Watertown, Massachusetts by Locomobile Company of America.

Driving America
 On Exhibit

at Henry Ford Museum in Driving America

Object ID

86.141.1

Credit

From the Collections of The Henry Ford.

Material

Metal
Wood (Plant material)
Rubber (Material)

Color

Red
Green
White (Color)

Specifications

Make & Model: 1899 Locomobile runabout

Maker: Locomobile Company of America, Watertown, Massachusetts

Engine: 2-cylinder steam, double acting, 2.5 inch bore x 3.5 inch stroke

Height: 72 inches

Wheelbase: 58 inches

Width: 63 inches

Overall length: 114.5 inches

Weight: 700 pounds

Horsepower: 4 at 150 psi

Pounds per horsepower: 175

Price: $600

Average 1899 wage: $428 per year

Time you'd work to buy this car: about 1 year, 5 months

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