Superior Grain Drill, circa 1900

Summary

Drilling grain was superior to hand sowing because it distributed seed uniformly at a controlled depth and covered it properly. Less seed per acre was used, but higher yields resulted. Early grain drills opened the seedbed with hoes, but they tended to clog with field debris. The disk-type opener easily cut through the debris, allowing for larger, more effective drills.

Drilling grain was superior to hand sowing because it distributed seed uniformly at a controlled depth and covered it properly. Less seed per acre was used, but higher yields resulted. Early grain drills opened the seedbed with hoes, but they tended to clog with field debris. The disk-type opener easily cut through the debris, allowing for larger, more effective drills.

Artifact

Seed drill

Date Made

circa 1900

Agriculture
 On Exhibit

at Henry Ford Museum in Agriculture

Object ID

00.39.197

Credit

From the Collections of The Henry Ford.

Material

Wood (Plant material)
Metal

Dimensions

Width: 84 in

Length: 92 in

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